queenbroslob:

laina:

weloveshortvideos:

Got my j’s on

NOOOOO

I showed this to everyone at work that would give me the time of day.

rhamphotheca:

Fish Out of Water Learn to Walk

Around 400 million years ago, fish left the water and started to evolve into land-loving creatures. But how did the transition happen? A new and unusual experiment could shed some light on the kinds of changes that enabled fins to become limbs. Researchers took a fish species known to be able to walk on its fins from time to time, and raised it on land. Watch the fish promenade in this Nature Video.

Read the paper: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13708

Read the News & Views: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature13743

English factoids: what is Germanic-only English like?

linguisten:

polyglottery:

One of my favourite aspects about English is how it really is a combination of other language families, namely Germanic, Latin, French and, of course, smörgåsbord*-servings of others. This versatility makes English an extremely flexible, but also difficult, language to learn — especially if you don’t already speak a Germanic or Latin language. 

image

— Origins of English, form the English language article on Wikipedia

My favourite demonstration of the mixed nature of English is the article “Uncleftish Beholding”, where Poul Anderson wrote about the basics of atomic theory using only Germanic words. 

Since so many scientific and academic terms have Latin and Greek roots, the essay reads very differently… for instance, instead of “atomic theory”, the title is “uncleftish beholding”, where cleft is a Germanic word for “division”. 

Here’s an extract:

For most of its being, mankind did not know what things are made of, but could only guess. With the growth of worldken, we began to learn, and today we have a beholding of stuff and work that watching bears out, both in the workstead and in daily life.

Here are some of his replacements:

  • "Chemical elements" -> "firststuffs"
  • "Hydrogen" -> "waterstuff"
  • "Oxygen" -> "sourstuff**"
  • "Helium" -> "sunstuff"
  • "Molecule" -> “bulkbit”
  • "Compound" -> “binding”

*See what I did there?

**Germanic speakers will be familair with e.g. the terms “Sauerstoff” (German), “zuurstof” (Dutch) and “syre” (Danish), which all have connotations with sourness or sharpness. 

Sauerstoff is exactly the same type of word formation as its model Oxygen in Greek; same with Helium and Hydrogen, they both contain the Greek roots for ‘sun’ and ‘water’. 

libutron:

Fornasini’s Spiny Reed Frog
Afrixalus fornasini (Hyperoliidae) is an african frog characterized by its color pattern, dark with broad light silverish dorsolateral bands from tip of snout to anus. The bands meet posteriorly, not anteriorly. About half the specimens in northern populations have the entire dorsum silverish white. 
Specimen shown is a female, no stripe morph.
The distribution recorded for this species is from coastal Kenya southward through eastern and southern Tanzania, Malawi, Mozambique and eastern Zimbabwe to coastal KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa. 
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©James Vonesh
Locality: Amani Natural Reserve, Usambara, Tanzania

libutron:

Fornasini’s Spiny Reed Frog

Afrixalus fornasini (Hyperoliidae) is an african frog characterized by its color pattern, dark with broad light silverish dorsolateral bands from tip of snout to anus. The bands meet posteriorly, not anteriorly. About half the specimens in northern populations have the entire dorsum silverish white. 

Specimen shown is a female, no stripe morph.

The distribution recorded for this species is from coastal Kenya southward through eastern and southern Tanzania, Malawi, Mozambique and eastern Zimbabwe to coastal KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa. 

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©James Vonesh

Locality: Amani Natural Reserve, Usambara, Tanzania

Reblogged from inthecreek